housing

What now for energy efficiency policy in UK homes?

Blog by Dr Charlie Wilson (Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research)   UK homes account for just under a quarter of national greenhouse gas emissions. Improving their efficiency not only reduces emissions, but also improves health and wellbeing, and creates jobs. The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) recently retweeted the headline findings …

Energy Efficiency: Time to get out of reverse gear

by Jan Rosenow & Richard Cowart In recent years across the UK, citizens, government, and the business community have all demonstrated a willingness to lead the world in the fight against climate change. So the mystery today is – why is the UK walking away from energy efficiency, the most effective and least-cost way of …

Why We Need to Shift Focus from Energy Supply to Reducing Demand

Mari Martiskainen asks whether it is time to have a real debate about moving our focus from energy supply to realising the benefits of energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) reported last week that the energy efficiency market was worth between $310 billion and $360 billion in 2011; thanks to energy efficiency improvements in …

Tackling the existing building stock as a real energy policy priority

By Mari Martiskainen and Florian Kern, Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand, SPRU Those familiar with the UK’s energy efficiency policy for buildings are aware that back in 2006 the then Labour government announced that all new domestic buildings would need to be ‘zero carbon’ from 2016 to help meet the government’s energy and climate …

­Davey: Energy Efficiency Key Agenda in Upcoming Elections

“We need to see energy efficiency as part of the nation’s infrastructure programme”. This was the charge of Ed Davey, Liberal MP and Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. Davey was speaking at an Association for the Conservation of Energy event to say thanks to outgoing director Andrew Warren, often referred to as the cheerleader …